We tried to tell them when we marched in 2003 against the Iraq War

Iraq War Hindsight
Criticism of the Iraq invasion doesn’t stem from “hindsight”
Tony Blair and his allies have some incredible gall to try to dismiss the findings of the Chilcot report as being based on “hindsight”.

Back in 2003 when the likes of Tony Blair, Jack Straw and Alistair Campbell were incessantly propagandising in favour of British involvement in George W. Bush’s imperialist warmongering, there were plenty of people pointing out the flaws in their case for war.

The claim that our criticisms of their warmongering have solely sprung up solely through the wisdom of “hindsight” is a disgusting display of attempted revisionism.

Robin Cook

In his famous resignation speech Robin Cook pointed out a number of things. One of the most important themes was that the invasion and occupation of Iraq would represent an appalling failure in British diplomacy.

Charles Kennedy

The Chilcot report found that the peaceful options had not been exhausted before Bush and Blair rushed into war. Charles Kennedy made this point in a passionate speech against the invasion.

Jeremy Corbyn

As the democratically elected leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn has a much higher profile in 2016 than he did back in 2003 when he opposed the invasion of Iraq (he can be seen sitting behind Robin Cook during his resignation speech).

Tony Benn

Of all of the opponents of Blair’s insistence on helping the United States with their invasion and occupation of Iraq, Tony Benn was the most eloquent and compelling.
Read more at anotherangryvoice.blogspot.co.uk


From Winston Churchill to Tony Blair: How British Leaders Destroyed Iraq for over a Century

After seven years, the Chilcot report has delivered a damning verdict on Tony Blair’s role in the war on Iraq, but British Prime Ministers playing a destructive role in Iraq is a centuries old practice.

Britain has used its military might and commercial prowess to subjugate Iraq and control its oil resources for over one hundred years.

Churchill invented Iraq. The end of World War I left Britain and France in command of the Middle East and the allies carved up the region as the defeated Ottoman Empire fell apart. Winston Churchill convened the 1912 Conference in Cairo to determine the boundaries of the British Middle Eastern mandate. After giving Jordan to Prince Abdullah, Churchill, gave Prince Abdullah’s brother Faisal an arbitrary patch of desert that became Iraq.

Historian Michael R. Burch recalls how the huge zigzag in Jordan’s eastern border with Saudi Arabia has been called “Winston’s Hiccup” or “Churchill’s Sneeze” because Churchill carelessly drew the expansive boundary after a generous lunch.

Churchill’s imperial foreign policy has caused a century of instability in Iraq by arbitrarily locking together three warring ethnic groups that have been bleeding heavily ever since. In Iraq, Churchill bundled together the three Ottoman vilayets of Basra that was predominantly Shiite, Baghdad that was Sunni, and Mosul that was mainly Kurd.
Read more at globalresearch.ca

House of Commons: Jeremy Corbyn response to Chilcot inquiry

Jeremy Corbyn is the best hope for the UK at this time. We will not get anywhere with the Tories or Blairites who do not care what ordinary people think. A General election right now would get the Labour Party back in power, but only if Jeremy Corbyn is their leader. If Jeremy is pushed out then the Labour Party will not see the light of day for many decades.

Published in: on July 7, 2016 at 17:09  Leave a Comment  
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